Finding Felix Project

My photo
Berlin, Germany
The Finding Felix Project is a work for screen and publication from Katy Kavanaugh, a curator and filmmaker (katykavanaugh.weebly.com). A fellowship from Stanford University and The Freie Universität- Berlin allowed her to return to the Berlin Film Festival's 35 year-old Generation (formerly Kinderfilmfest) to collect evidence of the directive impact that international films seen in childhood can have toward shaping the breadth of a person's view of the world and the decisions they make. This investigation focuses on one eleven year-old film festival-goer whom Kavanaugh met while serving on the Kinderfilmfest's international jury in 2001. Ten years later, Kavanaugh wants to know how a childhood full of international films influenced Felix's life so far. Meanwhile, with help from Media Consultant Tina Toepfel and Gintare Malinauskaite, PhD History at Humboldt Universität, Felix has been found and is now in post-production. To help meet its completion goal, please consider contributing via our fiscal sponsor, Cinefemme.net.

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Benjamin Kiesewetter, film memory: WRONY (Crows) 1995 D. Kedzierzawska, Poland

Benjamin Kiesewetter is completing a PhD in Philosophy at Humboldt Universität, Berlin. He sat on the children's jury in 1990 at age 10, one of the youngest, when the festival section had just one jury. A habitual newspaper generator, he and a friend organized the first child-reported journal at the Kinderfilmfest, called "Regenbogen" or rainbow and printed the newspaper for several years following. He was the sole Berlinale journalist asked to interview the actress Sophia Loren. He wrote for newspapers all through school but decided that the writing he wanted to do was to be compelled by Philosophy, and now particularly his thesis question, "What should I do?" Prototypes of that question occur, he believes, earlier than most people think--around age six.

The film WRONY Crows was directed and photographed by the same team of Dorota Kedzierzawska and cinematographer Arthur Reinhart, whose film JUTRO BEDZIE LEPIEJ Tomorrow Will Be Better won the International Jury's prize in this year's Generation section.

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